Loukoumades

Loukoumades (Greek), lokma tatlısı or simply lokma (Turkish) or lokmades (Cypriot) (Greek: λουκουμάδες, singular λουκουμάς loukoumas, luqmat al-qadi (Arabic:لقمة القاضي, Persian: بامیه bāmyieh, see etymology below) are a kind of fried-dough pastry made of deep fried dough soaked in sugar syrup or honey and cinnamon, and sometimes sprinkled with sesame.

Regional varieties

In Greece, loukoumades are commonly spiced with cinnamon in a honey syrup and can be sprinkled lightly with powdered sugar.

In ancient Greece, these deep fried dough balls were served to the winners of the Greek Olympics. The Greek poet Callimachus was the first to state that these deep fried dough balls were soaked in honey and then served to the winners as "honey tokens".[1] The pastry is called zvingoi by the Greek Jews, who make them as Hanukkah treats. It is claimed to have been originated by the Romaniotes, though the name derives from medieval German swinge.[2] A similar dish is also found in Italy as sfingi di San Giuseppe.

Various other kinds of fried dough with syrup are found in the Mediterranean, Middle East, and South Asia, from the Italian struffoli (the most similar to loukoumades in preparation) and zeppole (more like an American cake doughnut) to the Indian and Pakistani jalebi and gulab jamun.

Etymology

The Turkish word lokma means 'mouthful' or 'morsel', from Arabic لقمة luqma(t).[3] A version called لقمة القاضي luqmat al-qādi (judge's mouthful) was described by al-Baghdadi in the 13th century[4] and is made in Arab countries to this day.

See also

Food portal

References

Further reading

  • A.D. Alderson and Fahir İz, The Concise Oxford Turkish Dictionary, 1959. ISBN 0-19-864109-5
  • Γ. Μπαμπινιώτης (Babiniotis), Λεξικό της Νέας Ελληνικής Γλώσσας, Athens, 1998
  • Oxford Companion to Food, s.v. jalebi.
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