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Cabinet reshuffle

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Title: Cabinet reshuffle  
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Subject: Cabinet reshuffles in the United Kingdom, Cabinet of President Olusegun Obasanjo, Ecumenical Cabinet of Xenophon Zolotas, Government of the United Kingdom, Natasha Michael
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Cabinet reshuffle

In the parliamentary system a cabinet reshuffle or shuffle is an informal term for an event that occurs when a head of government rotates or changes the composition of ministers in their cabinet.

Cabinet reshuffles happen for a variety of reasons. Periodically, smaller reshuffles are needed to replace ministers who have resigned, retired or died. Reshuffles are also a way for a premier to "refresh" the government, often in the face of poor polling numbers; remove poor performers; and reward supporters and punish others. It is common after elections, even if the party in power is retained, as the prime minister's reading of public opinion as evidenced by the election may require some change in policy, in addition to any changes resulting from the retirement or defeat of individuals ministers at the election. Similarly, when a new prime minister enters office from the same party as the previous one, he or she might appoint a very different ministry than that of his or her predecessor to reflect a change in policies and priorities; an example is Gordon Brown's government, formed in 2007 after the departure of Tony Blair.

A reshuffle also provides an opportunity to create, abolish and rename departments (and ministerial posts) and to reassign responsibilities among departments. This may be done to reflect new priorities or for reasons of efficiency.

Cabinet reshuffles are far less common in systems where members of the Cabinet are not drawn from the George W. Bush, respectively).

See also

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