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Aloo gosht

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Aloo gosht

Aloo gosht
A plate of Pakistani-style Aloo gosht
Type Curry
Place of origin Pakistan, North India
Region or state South Asia
Main ingredients Meat and potato
Cookbook:Aloo gosht 

Aloo gosht (Urdu: آلو گوشت‎) is a meat curry in Pakistani and North Indian cuisine. It consists of potatoes ("aloo") cooked with meat ("gosht"), usually lamb or mutton, in a stew-like shorba gravy.[1][2] The dish can be served and eaten with plain rice or with bread such as roti, paratha or naan.

History

It is a favorite and common dish in Pakistani meals[1][3] and is commonly consumed as a comfort food.[4][5]

Preparation

There are various methods of cooking aloo gosht.[4] Generally, the preparation method involves cooking lamb pieces over medium heat with various spices, simmered with potatoes.[6] To prepare, a specified quantity of lamb meat (cut into chunks) is first added. Tomatoes, along with cinnamon, bay leaves, ginger, garlic, red chili powder, cumin seeds, fried onions, black cardamom, garam masala and cooking oil are added and stirred.[4] Potatoes and salt are applied and mixed. Water is also added, in a proportion that is enough to cover the meat, and the dish is heated until it is brought to the boil. The aloo gosht is covered and left to simmer until the meat becomes tender. Once ready, it may be garnished with chopped coriander and served hot.[2][4]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Mohiuddin, Yasmeen Niaz (2007). Pakistan: A Global Studies Handbook. ABC-CLIO. p. 325.  
  2. ^ a b Wickramasinghe, Priya; Rajah, Carol Selva (2005). Food of India. Murdoch Books. p. 124.  
  3. ^ Edelstein, Sari (2010). Food, Cuisine, and Cultural Competency for Culinary, Hospitality, and Nutrition Professionals. Jones & Bartlett Publishers. p. 262.  
  4. ^ a b c d Nuzhat Classic Recipes. AuthorHouse. 2009. pp. 1–2.  
  5. ^ Singh, Khushwant (2010). City Improbable: Writings. Penguin Books India. p. 189.  
  6. ^ "Aloo Gosht". PakiRecipies.com. Retrieved 18 August 2012. 
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