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Afshar people

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Title: Afshar people  
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Afshar people

The Afshar, also spelled Awshar or Afşar, are one of the Oghuz Turkic peoples.[1] These originally nomadic Oghuz tribes moved from Central Asia and initially settled in Iranian Azerbaijan, later being relocated by the Safavids to Khurasan and Mazandaran.[2] Today, they are variously grouped as a branch of the Turkmens[3] or the Azerbaijanis.[4]

Afshars in Iran remain a largely nomadic group,[5] with tribes in central Anatolia, northern Iran, and Azerbaijan.[6] They were the founders of the Afsharid and Karamanid dynasties.[7]

Nader Shah, who became Shah of Iran in 1736, was from the Qirqlu tribe of Afshar.[8][9]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Oberling, P. "AFŠĀR". Encyclopedia Iranica. Retrieved 9 July 2009. AFŠĀR, one of the twenty-four original Ḡuz Turkic tribes 
  2. ^ Iran's Diverse Peoples: A Reference Sourcebook, ed. Massoume Price, (ABC-CLIO, 2005), pp. 75, 89.
  3. ^ From multilingual empire to contested modern state, Touraj Atabaki, Iran in the 21st Century: Politics, Economics & Conflict, ed. Homa Katouzian, Hossein Shahidi, (Routledge, 2008), 41.
  4. ^ Richard V. Weekes. Muslim peoples: a world ethnographic survey. AZERI. — Greenwood Press, 1978 — p. 56 — ISBN 9780837198804
  5. ^ Encyclopedia of The Modern Middle East and North Africa, (Detroit: Thomson Gale, 2004) P. 1112
  6. ^ http://www.baluch-rugs.com/History/People/Afshar_Anatolia.htm
  7. ^ Claude Cahen, Pre-Ottoman Turkey: a general survey of the material and spiritual culture and history c. 1071-1330, trans. J. Jones-Williams (New York: Taplinger, 1968), 281-2.
  8. ^ Tribal resurgence and the Decline of the bureaucracy in the eighteenth century, A.K.S. Lambton, Studies in Eighteenth Century Islamic History, ed. Thomas Naff; Roger Owen, (Southern Illinois University Press, 1977), 108-109.  – via Questia (subscription required)
  9. ^ The Struggle for Persia, 1709-1785, Cambridge Illustrated Atlas, Warfare: Renaissance to Revolution, 1492-1792, ed. Jeremy Black, (Cambridge University Press, 1996), 142.

References

  • AFŠĀR, P.Oberling, Encyclopædia Iranica, (9 July 2009);"AFŠĀR, one of the twenty-four original Ḡuz Turkic tribes".[1]
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