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Tourism in Portland, Oregon

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Tourism in Portland, Oregon

The Portland metropolitan area in the U.S. states of Oregon and Washington has a variety of tourist attractions.

Cultural

  • 24 Hour Church of Elvis, exhibit and museum
  • Blue Sky Gallery, exhibits and archives for local and national photographers
  • Klickitat Street, home of fictional characters Henry Huggins, Ramona Quimby and Beatrice "Beezus" Quimby in the children's book series by Beverley Cleary; a sculpture garden is on NE 37th
  • Museum of Contemporary Craft, oldest continuously-running craft institution in the U.S. exhibiting local and international artists' work
  • Northwest Film Center, film and video exhibition, film making arts education, and public information programs; sponsors the Portland International Film Festival, Northwest Filmmakers' Festival, Reel Music Film Festival, Portland Jewish Film Festival, and the Young People's Film Festival.
  • Portland Art Museum, oldest art museum on the West Coast, seventh oldest in the United States, more than 42,000 permanent works of art, and at least one major traveling exhibition, Native American art, Northwest art, modern and contemporary art, Asian art, and an outdoor public sculpture garden
  • Portland Institute for Contemporary Art, contemporary performance and visual arts programming, including the Time-Based Art Festival each September
  • Portlandia, second-largest copper repoussé statue in the U.S., after the Statue of Liberty
  • Powell's City of Books, claims to be the largest independent new and used bookstore in the world at 68,000 square feet (6,300 m2), about 1.6 acres of retail floor space
  • Voodoo Doughnut, unusual doughnuts, eclectic decor, iconic pink boxes with drawings of voodoo priests, legal wedding services with catered receptions

Nightclubs

  • Cotton Club, 1960s Soul Music venue
  • Crystal Ballroom, 1914 ballroom with floating floor; since 1960s, a dance and concert venue
  • Dante's, live contemporary music venue
  • Ground Kontrol, bar and one of the best video arcades in the U.S.
  • La Luna, prominent with the emergence of Grunge music in the 1990s; formerly named Ninth Street Exit (1970s), and Pine Street Theater (1980–1986)
  • Satyricon nightclub, alternative rock venue 1983–2003, closed 2010
  • X-Ray Cafe, one of the best rock and roll clubs in the country 1990 to 1994, prominent in Portland's underground culture

Events

  • Hood to Coast relay race, late August team charity fundraising race, among longest major relays and the largest with 20,000+ participants, 322 kilometres (200 mi) course from Timberline Lodge to Seaside on the Oregon Coast
  • Mt. Hood Jazz Festival, mid-August
  • Oregon International Air Show, largest civilian air show on the U.S. West Coast, held July or August
  • Portland Farmers Market, weekly outdoor market, one of the five best farmers markets in the U.S., mid-March through December
  • Portland International Auto Show, held in January
  • Portland Rose Festival, June civic festival with hundreds of events including the second largest all-floral parade in the U.S.
  • Portland Saturday Market, outdoor arts and crafts market, largest continuously operated outdoor market in the U.S., weekends March through Christmas
  • Waterfront Blues Festival, charity fundraiser for Oregon Food Bank, first weekend in July, 150 performances on four stages
  • Portland Urban Iditarod, team event through downtown Portland which emphasizes unique themes and costumes on the first Saturday in March

Golf

Historical

Parks and gardens

Science, technology and education

Shopping

Other

Portland bridges

See also

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